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Saturday, May 29, 2010

Brazil's World Cup: Everything is Good to Go

Brazil's World Cup: The Worrying Starts Early

Time


From the text: "Everybody wants to go to the party but no one wants to pay for it."


I shouldn't be writing about things i don't understand or know very little about, especially as it concerns the inner workings of corporate decisions and constructions plans.

Also, fyi, people writing in Brazil may not enjoy the say freedoms of expression as, say, our fellow bloggers do in the U.S., for example. Extreme diplomacy is called for when criticizing this, that, or the other.

However, i do think the Andrew is right in that, no, i have not seen anything remotely conducive to bigging up the conditions of those 12 stadiums slated to host the games.

Neither have i seen anything, in my hometown, so far, remotely suggestive that this is going to happen in the next 24 hours.

As much as i hate to see the fact that the authorities are depicted as inept in the article, i think there is something to be said about the lethary with which things are accomplished in our beloved neck of the woods.

But then again, when they happen, they happen with a bang! So, i will keep you posted. It should interest you if you're remotely keen on football (soccer).

Meanwhile, check out the video below: a theme song for Brazil for this year's World Cup.



Translate? No. I'm thoroughly hopeless at translation.

2 comments:

  1. It might surprise you to learn that people in Brazil have as much freedom if not more than we do here in America. Theirs is a more relaxed and easy going society devoid of the ultra-right wing nuts who are tearing our country apart.
    Brazil has more tolerance and a greater amount of diversity and thus their formula to succeed as one of the next world powers in the decades to come. While we here at home keep fighting these stupid culture wars and the rich and the corporations get richer.
    saludos,
    raulito

    ReplyDelete
  2. Raulito, this is not what we have been reading about and hearing from bloggers, unfortunately. Bloggers have been forced by courts to remove posts that are less than appreciative of the colonial mindset...

    ReplyDelete